Rights offering detail :
Prisoners of Revolution: a political novel
Mar. 16, 2020
Author:
Amar Mudi
Category:
Digital: Fiction: Thriller
Description:
A Naxal or Naxalite is a member of any organization that claims to have the legacy of a communist party founded in Calcutta in 1969. They have been operating for more than 40 years in central and eastern India with a demand for land and jobs for the poor and also possess an ultimate motive to have a communist society by overthrowing India’s semi-colonial and semi-feudal form of rule. One significant feature of the movement was the participation of students in the movement at par with peasants. But till now, their role was not highlighted by any scholar or historian. This movement broke away from the vestige of its past and took a new line of operation.

On 25 May 1967, in an obscure village of Bengal, nine men, women, and children died in police firing, while trying to take possession of the surplus land of a big landlord. It was a shock for a complacent nation that was oblivious to the plight of its peasants. It marked the beginning of the Naxalbari Movement. But, the question was why did they launch a battle against the mighty state? Had they read Marx, Lenin, and Mao? Were they sure of what they were fighting for?

Prisoners of Revolution: a political novel by Amar Mudi unravels through six momentous years from 1967 to 1973 in Babulpuir, a microcosmic representation of thousands of other villages in Bengal. Fifty years hence, Adivasis have become the mainstay of this armed resistance—in Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Bihar, Jharkhand, West Bengal, and Andhra Pradesh. Why is the fire of revolution still ablaze in their hearts, though it has dissipated from the urban climate? This novel offers a hypothesis.

Amar Mudi:
Born in 1955 in Ranisarai, West Midnapur, West Bengal, Amar Mudi has a master’s degree in Mass Communication. The author of a critically acclaimed novel, Curse of Badam Pahar: Savages of the East, he has many translation works into Bengali to his credit—Orhan Pamuk’s novel, My Name is Red, Ismail Kadare’s The Successor, Imre Kertesz’s Fatelessness, and Manohar Shyam Joshi’s Hindi novel, Kyaap. He has also published a compilation of poems, Jiban Jatra, and plays like Uttaradhikar and Thakurdar Coffin.
Rights available:
Yes, all languages except Hindi and English and all territories except Pakistan, Nepal, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka.
Rights sold:
NO
Other Information:
Reviews:
‘The novel ends with a mixed mood of both hope and despair. On the one hand, the reader looks forward in the hope of a better future, away from the place of oppression and political disturbance. On the other hand, there is a lingering feeling of loss: of peace, of a chance for a healthy environment where the old can witness their future generations grow.’ Davidiscourse

‘Published by Niyogi Books under its Olive Turtle imprint, the novel takes the readers through the individual journeys of each of the characters as the author comments on the futility of a structured government in resolving the problems and sufferings of the marginalized and the oppressed in society.
The novel ends with a mixed mood of both hope and despair. On the one hand, the reader looks forward in the hope of a better future, away from the place of oppression and political disturbance. On the other hand, there is a lingering feeling of loss: of peace, of a chance for a healthy environment where the old can witness their future generations grow.’ Business Standard
Contact:
Trisha Niyogi
Niyogi Books Private Ltd
trishaniyogi@niyogibooksindia.com
phone: 9999501175
D-77, Okhla Industrial Area, Phase 1, New Delhi-110020, India, New Delhi, DL 110020
Offering #:
16216
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