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Available at Amazon and at my website...www.larrypatten.com
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Published in 2014. Available at Amazon.
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writer : larry@larrypatten.com
Larry Patten
illustration
Sharing secrets . . .

THE GRAVITY OF HAPPINESS

Nineteen-year year old James March cares for his dying mother. In their final days together, Mary March tells about a man named Joe and the four life-changing Christmas Eves they shared before James was born. After her death, and after discovering a bank account he never knew existed, James visits the town where his mother spent her memorable Christmas Eves. Though money is the outward reason for his journey, inwardly James seeks to learn more about his mother’s past and the man who may be his father.

THE GRAVITY OF HAPPINESS (93,800 words) is mainstream fiction, a "coming-of-wisdom" story for a young man whose mother, and future plans, has died. It’s also a secular nod to the Christmas tale (everything about Christmas is true, even the parts that aren't). GRAVITY is as easily read in July as December.

Christmas is referred to as “the most wonderful time of the year,” but it’s also a night that brings out the best, and the worst, in people.


SKILLS
Writing, Fiction writing
GENRES & SPECIALTIES
General fiction, Religious, Mind/body/spirit, Health, Hospice
MOST RECENT PROJECTS
Each week at www.larrypatten.com I write “faithful and foolish” reflections on the encounters between the Holy and human.

I also write weekly thoughts about my hospice experiences at www.hospice-matters.com.

Here's a snippet, a tease, from this week's (April 20, 2017) hospice-influenced thoughts on the normal, and nearly always unsettling, appearance of . . . tears. Who really wants to cry?

*********

He was a good guy and a compassionate chaplain. Soft spoken and sweet, he’d always take the extra minute or hour to listen to someone who was hurting. In meetings, he added supportive reactions or funny comments that would enliven a dull hour.

This chaplain left our hospice for a church or hospital or overseas mission opportunity. (Hey, I want to keep these fake details about his life as ambiguous as possible!)

And then he died. Prostate cancer: one day seemingly healthy, the next day not. Served by the hospice where he’d once worked, he never saw sixty candles on his birthday cake.

Now I called his son.

Here’s the truth: I didn’t know his father that well. We’d survived boring meetings together and chatted in the office hallways. We’d consulted on a handful of patients. I’d read chart notes. But, unlike his family or his network of friends, I was more of a professional acquaintance . . .

YOU CAN READ THE WHOLE DARN DEAL AT: http://hospice-matters.com/grief-busy-street-australia/

BEST-KNOWN PROJECTS
Two self-published titles, both available on Amazon:

A COMPANION FOR THE JOURNEY: 41 Reflections (mostly) On the Lord's Prayer.

ANOTHER COMPANION FOR THE JOURNEY: 40 Reflections (and Questions) on Faith.

SPECIALIZED TRAINING, WORK EXPERIENCE, HONORS
I'm ordained in the United Methodist Church, currently working in a hospice.