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Author! Author!
by:  Anne Mini, First Reader Editing
web:  http://www.annemini.com
All of the things a good writer was supposed to be born knowing -- but none of us actually were. To check out extensive archives or ask a salient question, please visit the Author! Author! website.
November 2, 2014

When "where do I submit?" is a multiple-choice question

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When last we met, before time so rudely interrupted me by passing in the conventional manner, we were deep in the throes of discussing the thorny issue of exclusive submissions, de facto and otherwise. As flattering as it is to be asked not to send your manuscript elsewhere while an agent or editor at a small press considers your writing, it's not invariably to a conference pitcher or successful querier's advantage to give into the almost universal initial impulse to shout, "Yes! Yes! A thousand times, yes!" before it's entirely clear to what one is agreeing. Sometimes, that happy shout echoes later rather dismally in the ears of the writer caught in the ostensibly enviable situation of having a second agent or editor at a small press say yes to a query whilst the manuscript in question (or a partial) is dallying with the first.

That echo can be especially mournful, if you'll forgive my bringing it up, to the writer who learned only through first-hand experience that just because an agent or editor asks, usually quite nicely, if she may read the book before any other pro does, it doesn't necessarily speed up the consideration process. A request for an exclusive does not generally mean that the requester intends to clear his schedule to read those pages the instant they arrive, after all. That's not too astonishing, considering how rare it is for any single request for an exclusive to be the only one an agent or editor makes in, say, a conference season. Or in six months' worth of queries.

Oh, dear, did the behemoth thump that just shook the cosmos indicate that I should have advised you to sit down before reading that last paragraph? I'm not altogether flabbergasted, because frankly, misunderstanding -- or even misreading -- the terms of an exclusive submission request tends to be the norm, rather than the exception. All too often, overjoyed pitchers and queriers will respond to what they think the agent is asking, rather than what she actually says.

Completely understandable, right, when such requests so frequently come as a surprise? In the moment, even a simple "Hey, that was a good pitch; send me the first 30 pages" can sound like winning, if not the lottery, then at least a bet on a long shot at the Kentucky Derby. With every cell in a writer's brain gurgling, "At last! At last!" it's not particularly uncommon for conference pitchers to presume that any request for pages could only have been intended as an exclusive.

"But Anne!" those of you who joined me for our last discussion on the topic cry. "How can that be? Such expectations are always stated explicitly. So unless an agent or editor actually asks for an exclusive, or the agency for which the requesting agent works has a clearly-expressed exclusives-only policy posted on its website, why would it ever be to a submitter's advantage to stop submitting to others while the requesting agent is reading the manuscript? Heck, why would it even be to that writer's advantage to cease querying in the meantime?"

The short answer is that it wouldn't -- and how gratifying that you caught that, inveterate readers. It almost invariably slows down a manuscript's search for a professional home to submit, much less query, only one agency at a time. And what does the writer gain by the delay, really? At best, submitting it to only one agent might save the writer from having to query and/or submit further. Not an insignificant conservation of energy, true, but bought at the expense of quite a risk.

"What risk?" those of you delighted by the very notion of having to query and submit only once over the course of a long and doubtless illustrious literary career. "Spending as little time as possible in this stress-fest sounds completely fabulous to me!"

And it could indeed be great -- presuming that this agent is in fact the perfect fit for the book, literary market conditions appear to be favorable for that book category, and the manuscript itself is in great shape. Oh, and that our old pal and nemesis, Millicent the agency screener, happens to be in an exceptionally good mood on the day that the submission crosses her desk. If even one of those elements happens to be slightly off, resulting in Agent #1's not saying yes, then that eager writer will have to start all over again from scratch.

Which, let's face it, can require quite a bit more oomph than getting a set of queries out the door the first time around. Post-rejection querying, pitching, and even submission in response to the next yes calls for not only faith in your talent and your work -- it also requires telling the hobgoblins of doubt to stop murmuring in the dead of night something that logic tells us cannot possibly be true: that a rejection from one agent must mean that every other agent currently trundling across the earth's crust would just reject it, too.

"So why bother?" the hobgoblins chortle at 3 a.m. "Why not just write off the book into which you have been pouring your heart and soul for eons? You could always start a new one."

Fortunately, hobgoblins are notoriously ignorant of the ways of the publishing industry. The next time they rear their ugly heads, inform them that good, even great, manuscripts get rejected all the time. It can take a while to find the right fit for a book. So shut up and let nice writers everywhere sleep, already!

Given that level of querying-, pitching-, and submission-related anxiety, it's hardly astounding that the overwhelming majority of aspiring writers respond to requests for exclusives with an enthusiastic chorus of, "By all of the great heavenly muses, YES! If I overnight it to you, will that be soon enough to get started?" As long as you're walking into it with a clear mutual understanding of what you and the requesting agent are and are not promising each other by agreeing to an exclusive, go ahead and be as enthusiastic as you please.

What's that the masses are thinking so loudly? That you'd like a refresher in what the default terms would be? Happy to oblige.

If a writer agrees to grant an exclusive to an agent,

(a) only that agent will have an opportunity to read the requested materials;

(b) no other agent is already looking at it;

(c) the writer will not submit it anywhere else;

(d) in return for these significant advantages (which, after all, mean that the agent will not have to compete with other agents to represent the book), the agent will make a legitimate effort to read and decide whether or not to offer representation, but

(e) if no time restriction is specified in advance, or if the agent always requests exclusives, the manuscript may simply be considered on precisely the same timeframe as every other requested by the agency.

Sometimes, though, even knowing all of that in advance and acting with according wisdom will not prevent a conscientious submitter from running into exclusive-related problems. What happens, for instance, if Agent A, the original requester, hasn't gotten back to the writer by the time another request for pages arrives? Oh, it could happen, if the writer has been serious enough about landing an agent to send out more than one query at a time.

That trajectory runs something like this: our hero/ine took a deep breath, girded his or her loins, and sent out a truly impressive array of queries to category-appropriate agents. Of those many recipients, several responded, asking to read pages. Response rates are as unique as snowflakes, though, so each agent responded in her own time. So once Agent A was delighted enough with the query to ask for an exclusive peek, it's entirely possible that our intrepid writer will have already sent out a partial to Agent B, as well as full manuscripts to Agents C and D.

Then, too, sometimes requests for pages come in clumps. If an e-querier sends out a barrage of missives all at once, he might well receive several positive responses withina few days. If nobody asks for an exclusive, no problem: he can just send them all out simultaneously. But what if one of those agents wants to be the only one looking at it?

Ponder the possibilities, please, until we meet again in Part II.

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November 1, 2014

Part II: go, team, go!

Have those of you devoted to conference pitching been feeling left out? No need: let's say that prior to a well-stocked writers' conference, our hero/ine knelt before his or her computer and swore not to allow a single viable (yet polite) opportunity to pitch pass ungrasped. It's entirely possible that s/he will stride away from those pitch sessions with more than one request. If only Agent A asked for an exclusive, should the our knight grant it, even if that means putting off non-exclusive requests from Agents B-D?

While we're tossing around rhetorical questions, what is the writer to tell all of those other agents in the meantime? And, at the risk of terrifying you, may I also inquire what happens if the exclusive-requester doesn't get back to the writer in a timely manner?

None of these are particularly uncommon dilemmas for submitters to face, incidentally. Often, though, writers who find themselves in these awkward positions are too embarrassed to discuss them. They tend to feel that they should have been prepared for any of these eventualities. After all, an exclusive is serious business, a matter of professional integrity, and therefore probably not the kind of thing to which a savvy writer would, upon mature consideration, grant lightly.

Say, in the midst of an extended fit of alternated giggling and hyperventilation because a REAL, LIVE AGENT has asked to see one's work. At that particular moment, the other seventeen queries one has out and about might conceivably slip one's mind.

Especially if, as is often the case, the request for an exclusive is a trifle vague. ("I'd like an exclusive on this, Minette," is often the extent of it.) In the throes of delight, the impulse to scream "YES!" has occasionally been known to overcome the completely rational urge to ask, "Excuse me, but what precisely would that mean for me?" Or even, "Pardon me, O person who has the power to change my life, but what happens if I don't say yes immediately?"

I can feel some of you quaking in your jammies over the idea of being bold enough to ask either of those questions. Or, indeed, any at all: follow-up questions in the wake of exclusive requests are as rare as spotting a unicorn having tea with the Loch Ness Monster on a blue moon. That's unfortunate, since, as junior high school taught so many of us, picking dare in a game of truth-or-dare is dangerous precisely because one does not get to hear all the details of the dare before agreeing to attempt it.

Oh, like I was the only eighth grader who…well, never mind. Suffice it to say that in manuscript submission, as in life, one makes better choices if one knows the options prior to choosing amongst them.

Which is to say: you have more power here than you think, provided you are aware of it in advance. Why? Well, think about it: as flattering as a request for an exclusive is to an aspiring writer, granting it is optional.

Before anyone starts jumping up and down, thrilled to the gills at the idea of magnificent concessions writers might wrest from an agent averse to reading competition, the power to which I refer is fairly limited. The writer may say yes to the exclusive, or she may say no. She may also say, "Thanks, but not now."

Not that the writer is required, or even encouraged, to give any of these responses directly to the agent, mind you. If the answer is anything but yes, don't contact the agent to explain. Trust me, if your manuscript doesn't arrive within a few months, Agent A will intuit that you're not leaping to say yes to an exclusive. Since the manuscript's arrival (accompanied, ideally, by a cover letter beginning, "Thank you so much for asking to read my pages on an exclusive basis," or something similar) would be the accepted means of agreeing to an exclusive, there's no call for the writer to fill Agent A's inbox with notifications that it's on its way, explanations that while an exclusive would be great, Agent B will have to respond first, or the most popular option of all: a long, whiny missive complaining that Agent C has had the manuscript for X amount of time without getting back to the writer, so could Agent A please retract that whole insistence-upon-an-exclusive thing?

I can tell you now that none of these communications will be appreciated. It's hardly news to agents that aspiring writers query and submit widely these days; it's quite normal for a savvy writer not to be able to grant an exclusive right away. Until that writer can, however, the particulars of who would need to respond simply don't matter to Agent A.

And no, in response to what half of you just thought so loudly, if Agent A prefers an exclusive, or if his agency does, you're not going to be able to talk him out of it. Regardless of how stressful you find the multiple-request situation, it's not fair to expect the agent to solve it for you. If you can't say yes now, say it when you can.

That doesn't mean, though, that you need to grant an open-ended exclusive. Whether you already know that Agents B-D want to read pages, that they are considering your query, or just that you wish to keep your options open, it's always a good idea to set a time limit on an exclusive. You should also reserve granting exclusives your top-choice agents.

What's that? When two million of you are shouting, it's hard to hear. Yes, 10,000 closest to me? "But Anne, I just want an agent! How the heck do I, someone brand-new to the business side of publishing, know who should be my top picks? All I really know about Agents A-D is that they represent books in my category!"

Actually, if you've done that much research, you're ahead of the game: it's not at all uncommon for aspiring writers to query agents without first checking to see what they do and don't represent. ("An agent's an agent, right?" they reason, wrongly.) It's also pretty common for pitchers to approach agents at conferences without having any idea what they represent. That's just annoying for everybody. It truly is in your book's best interest to do a bit of homework about what kinds of books an agent has sold recently before trying to interest him in representing yours.

But let's say that you didn't, perhaps for a good reason. Perhaps a conference's organizers simply assigned you to an agent for your pitch session; maybe you just entered thriller into one of those search engines, and it spit out every agent in the country that checked that box on a form. Or you spent most of your time with a guide to agents in the index-by-region section. Regardless of how you ended up with requests for pages from Agents A-D, you certainly have the means of finding out more about them before you submit, enabling you to decide which might be the best fit for you.

Why put in that effort, when all reputable agents sell books? Because, contrary to amazingly popular opinion amongst aspiring writers, no good writer wants to land just any agent; everyone wants the best agent for his or her book. Or should want that, at any rate.

How might a savvy writer figure out which interested agent that's likely to be? Well, a simple web search isn't a bad place to start. If the agency has a website -- and not all of them do, believe it or not, even at this late date -- it will usually list the major clients. Generally, it will also feature at least a brief bio for each of its member agents.

It's also worth checking whether the agent (or the agency) has a blog or has given interviews about being an agent. Not every agent does, of course, but why not embrace the generosity of those who have taken the time to share their literary preferences with potential clients?

My point: it's going to be awfully difficult to decide whether you're already excited enough about Agent A to be positive that she is the agent of your dreams -- positive enough that you're willing to forego, at least for now, submitting to Agents B-D -- in the absence of some substantive research about all of them. If, after doing that research, you don't feel that you would say yes right away if Agent A offered to represent your book, are you sure that you want to give A an exclusive that's going to limit your ability to show your manuscript to others?

Think of granting an exclusive as if you were applying for early admission to an Ivy League school: if the school of your dreams lets you in, you're not going to want to apply to other universities, right? By applying early, you are saying that you will accept their offer of admission, and the school can add you to its roster of new students without having to worry that you're going to go to another school instead.

It's a win/win -- but only if that actually was the school you wanted to attend. (I speak from experience here: once I got into Harvard early, I had a whale of a good time going to group interviews with my high school friends and saying, "Wow, that's an interesting question, Mr. Alumnus. Allow me to turn that question into an opportunity to discuss the merits of Kathleen here." And then Kathleen would get all excited, because Mr. Alumnus had the power to admit her to the school of her dreams.

Oh, you thought I woke up one bright day as an adult and suddenly became public-spirited? I regard a broad range of endeavor as team sport.)

If the best agent in the known universe for your type of writing asks for an exclusive, you might be well advised to say yes. But if you have any doubt in your mind about whether Harvard really is a better school for your intended studies than Yale, Columbia, or Berkeley -- to mix my metaphors again, as well as irk my erstwhile classmates -- you might want to apply to all of them at the same time. That way, you may later decide between those that do admit you.

Ah, that's a nice image, isn't it? Feel free to luxuriate in it until Part III.

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November 1, 2014

Part III: the power! The pageantry!

A request for exclusive is great, in short, only in proportion to how much you would like to be represented by the person asking for it. The good news is that you don't have to wait around passively. Once you have done your homework, you can more easily decide whether you would prefer to go steady right off the bat or date around a little. Got it?

If not, I can keep coming up with parallels all day, I assure you. Don't make me delve into my vast store of zoology metaphors.

Do all of those averted eyes mean that you have no intention of saying no to a REAL, LIVE AGENT that wants to SEE YOUR WORK? Or merely that you're hoping desperately that the muses have abruptly decided to assign one of their number to make sure that of those 17 agents you have approached, the only one that prefers exclusive submissions contacts you first, swears to get back to you within 48 hours, and offers to sign you in 36?

Well, I wish the best for you, so I hope it's the latter, too, but let's assume for the moment that at least one writer out there falls into the former category. If you say yes, lone intender, set a reasonable time limit on the exclusive, so you don't keep your manuscript or proposal off the market too long. This prudent step will save you from the unfortunately common dilemma of the writer who granted an exclusive a year ago and still hasn't heard back.

Yes, in response to that gigantic collective gasp I just heard out there: one does hear rumors of agents who ask for exclusives, then hold onto the manuscript for months on end. Or even -- brace yourself -- a year or two.

I can neither confirm nor deny this, of course. All I can tell you that since the economic downturn began, such rumors have escalated astronomically.

Set a time limit, politely. Three months is ample. (And no, turning it into three weeks will almost certainly not get your manuscript read any faster. This is no time to be unreasonable in your expectations.)

No need to turn asking for the time limit into an experiment in negotiation, either. Simply include a sentence in your submission's cover letter along the lines of I am delighted to give you an exclusive look at my manuscript, as you requested, for the next three months.

Simple, direct -- and believe me, if Agent A has a problem with the amount of time you've specified, you will be receiving a call or an e-mail. It will probably come at the end of those three months, and it will probably be a request for more time, but hey, at least you will have established that you are not expecting to keep your manuscript out of circulation indefinitely.

Before those gusty sighs of relief blow anyone's pets out of the room, I add hastily: protecting your ability to market your work isn't always that simple. Negotiation generally isn't possible with the other type of exclusive request, the kind that emerges from an agency that only reviews manuscripts exclusively, for the exceedingly simple reason that the writer is not offered a choice in the matter. Consequently, a request for an exclusive from these folks is not so much a compliment to one's work (over and above the sheer desire to take a gander at some of it, that is) as a way of doing business.

In essence, exclusive-only agencies are saying to writers, "Look, since you chose to approach us, we assume that you have already done your homework about what we represent -- and believe us, we would not ask to see your manuscript if we didn't represent that kind of writing. So we expect you to say yes right away if we make you an offer. Now squeal with delight and hand over the pages, please."

Noticing a homework theme running throughout all of these unspoken assumptions? Good. Let me pull out the bullhorn to reiterate: because agents tend to assume that any serious writer would take the time to learn how the publishing industry does and doesn't work, submitters that don't do their homework are significantly more likely to get rejected than those who do.

Oh, did some of you want to ask a question? Here, allow me to lower my bullhorn.

"But Anne," the recently-deafened point out, uncovering their ears, "I don't get it. Why might an exclusives-only submissions policy be advantageous for an agency to embrace?"

Well, for one thing, it prevents them from feeling pressure to snap up a manuscript before another agency does. If you send them pages, they may safely assume that you won't be e-mailing them a week later to say, "Um, Agent Q has just made me an offer, slowpoke. I still would like to consider you, so could you drop everything else you might have intended to do for the foreseeable future and finish reading my manuscript so you can give me an answer? As in by the end of the week?"

Okay, so you wouldn't really be that rude. (Please tell me you wouldn't be that rude.) But agents who don't require exclusive submissions do receive these types of e-mails fairly often: nervous writers often assume, mistakenly, that they should be sending agents who have their manuscripts constant status updates, if not pleading or outright ultimata. A writer's sense of how long is too long can be awfully short. And agents hate the kind of missive mentioned in the last paragraph, because nobody, but nobody, reads faster than an agent who has just heard that the author of the manuscript that's been propping up his wobbly coffee table is fielding multiple offers.

Which is precisely the point. Agencies who demand exclusivity are, by definition, unlikely to find themselves in an Oh, my God, I have to read this 400-page novel by tomorrow! situation. After the third or fourth panicked all-nighter, requiring exclusives might start to look like a pretty handy policy.

Increased speed is the usual response to multiple offers, note, not to hearing that other agents are reading a book. Since people who work in agencies are perfectly well aware that turn-around times have been expanding exponentially of late, the mere fact that other agents are considering a manuscript isn't likely to affect its place in the reading queue at all.

All of which again begs the question: what does the writer get in return for agreeing not to submit to others for the time being? Not a heck of a lot, typically, unless the agency in question is in fact the best place for her work and she would unquestionably sign with them if they offered representation. But if one wants to submit to such an agency, one needs to follow its rules.

Happily, agencies that maintain this requirement tend to be far from quiet about it. Their agents will trumpet the fact from the conference dais. Requires exclusive submissions or even the relatively rare will accept only exclusive queries will appear upon their websites, in their listings in standard agency guides, and on their form-letter replies requesting your first 50 pages.

(Yes, in response to that shocked wail your psyche just sent flying in my general direction: positive responses often appear as form letters, too, even when they arrive via e-mail. I sympathize with your dismay.)

If exclusives-only agencies had company T-shirts, in short, they'd probably ask the silk-screener to add an asterisk after the company's name and a footnote on the back about not accepting simultaneous submissions. If they're serious about the policy, they're serious about it, and trying to shimmy around such a policy will only get a writer into trouble.

Do I feel some of you tensing up again? Relax -- not very many agencies harbor this requirement.

It limits their applicant pool, you see. Since they require their potential clients to bring their often protracted agent search to a screeching halt while the submission is under consideration, such agencies are, in the long run, more time-consuming for a writer to deal with than others. As a result, many ambitious aspiring writers, cautious about committing their time, will avoid approaching agencies with this policy.

Which, again, is a matter of personal choice. Or it would be, if you happened to notice before you queried that the agency in question required solo submissions. Do check their T-shirts in advance, because I assure you, no one concerned is going to have any sympathy for a writer complaining about feeling trapped in an exclusive.

They'll just assume that he didn't do his homework. Keep up the good work!

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October 25, 2014

Torn between two agents

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Ah, exclusivity. As a recent question from a member of the Author! Author! community reminded me, few issues trouble the sleep of writers new to submission more than this: if an agent asks to read my manuscript, may I show it to another while she's reading it?

That burning question does not concern merely the stressed-out fortunate lucky enough to have received a request for an exclusive peek at their manuscripts, either. Writers' minds are, let's face it, unusually gifted at spinning out scenarios both fabulous and fabulously disastrous about what happens to their manuscripts after those pages disappear into the murky depths of an agency, doubt abounds -- and multiplies unmercifully. What happens if an agent asks to see my book on an exclusive basis, the aspiring fret, and who could blame them? and she doesn't make up her mind before another agent asks to see it? What if I've already sent pages to fifteen other agents, and somebody asks for an exclusive? What if one of those fifteen never gets back to me, so I don't know whether I have a manuscript under consideration or not when a new one asks? While I'm at it, what if an agent really did want an exclusive, but I didn't pick up some subtle, publishing-world-specific signal and mistakenly submitted my book widely? What if paper-devouring giants come along and inhale my pages between the time they land at the agency of my dreams and when the agent of the aforementioned dreams has a chance to read them? What if...

Enough, already. The short answer to all of these questions is this: you're probably not going to find yourself in most of these situations. Particularly that one with the giants.

Or, as it happens, the one about being ethically bound not to show your work to a second agent while a first is pondering it. Contrary to popular dead-of-night fears, requests for exclusives -- the perversely longed-for situation in which an agent cries, "Wait! I liked your query/pitch/first few pages that I read so much that I want to be the only agent in Christendom reading it! Don't show it to anyone else until I have, 'kay?" -- are actually relatively rare. And contrary to rumors lingering from the writers' conference circuit, it's also not especially common for agents to demand exclusive peeks at manuscripts as a matter of policy.

Except that some agencies do harbor that policy. Some agents do ask for exclusives. And occasionally, a perfectly well-intentioned writer just trying to follow the rules finds herself singing the title of this post to a dark ceiling at 4 a.m.

How do I know this? Experience, mostly: the Author! Author! comment section has been the go-to source for writers' anxiety for years now. During and after every single conference season -- yes, and every single autumn, in the weeks after savvy writers have sent out post-Labor Day queries -- successful pitchers and queriers have come creeping to me furtively with a terrified question: what have I done, and how may I fix it?

Usually with several exclamation points. I have some reason to believe, then, that there's just a little bit of ambient confusion about when it is and is not okay to submit a manuscript to several agents or editor at a time. And, perhaps even more pertinent to the midnight terrors haunting many right about now, how should a writer lucky enough to walk away from a conference with more than one request for pages decide which agent or editor to submit to first?

The short answer, as it so often is in publishing matters, is it depends. The long answer is a question: what about these particular requests make you believe you have to rank them?

If you're like most writers gearing up to submit, the answer to the long answer probably runs a little something like this: well, obviously, I shouldn't submit to more than one agent at a time -- that would be rude. Or is that I've heard that agents consider it rude? Anyway, I wouldn't want to run the risk of offending anyone. Besides, if I submit only to the one I liked better -- which was that again? -- I don't have to come up with a graceful way to say no to the other one. And it's less work for me: if the first one says yes, I don't have to go to the trouble of making up another submission packet. But if I do that, must I wait for the first to say no before I send out pages to the second? What if the first never gets back to me? Or what if the first doesn't get back to me until after I've already submitted to the second, and then yells at me because he didn't want me to show the book to anyone else? And what if...

Hey, I wasn't kidding about writers' being gifted at spinning out the ol' plot lines. If that logic loop sounds familiar, the first thing to do is calm down. In the vast majority of multiple submissions, no problems arise whatsoever.

Especially if you're clever and conscientious enough to have double-checked the various agencies' websites and/or listings in a recent edition of one of the popular guides to literary agents. If an agency has a policy of demanding to be the only one considering a manuscript for representation, they'll generally say so. It's also quite normal for an agent expecting to read a manuscript without competition to ask for an exclusive point-blank.

And already, I hear sighs of relief bouncing off mountaintops around the cosmos. "Phew!" thousands of submitters mutter. "That was a close one. I'd heard that maybe all agents secretly expected me to submit, or even query, only one of them at a time. So when my already-bloodshot eyeballs caught sight of the title of this post, I instantly felt guilty!"

If so, you're not alone. The welter of dire warnings and fourth-hand horror stories floating around out there has created a miasma of anxiety around querying and submission. Surely, I don't have to tell any of you reading this that there's an awful lot of querying and submission advice out there, much of it contradictory. (Which is, in case those of you searching frantically through the archives have been wondering, why I always provide such extensive explanations for everything I advise here: since so many of my readers are considering quite a bit of competing information -- and frequently doing it in a moment when they are already feeling overwhelmed -- I believe that it's as important that you know why I'm suggesting something as to understand how to implement the suggestion. I never, ever want any of my readers to do what I say just because I say so. So there.)

I probably also don't have to tell you -- yet here I am doing it -- that quite often, submission problems are the result of believing the common wisdom and applying it to every agent one might ever want to approach, rather than carefully reading each agency's submission guidelines and treating each query/submission situation as unique.

Sometimes, though, even that level of hedging doesn't prevent a writer from falling into a ditch. Witness, for instance, the situation into which Virginia, a long-time member of the Author! Author! community, innocently tumbled a while back.

Help! I submitted only two queries to two agents. One got back to me quickly and did ask for exclusive right to review. A few days after I agreed to this, the second agent replied and asked for pages. I don't want to violate my agreement, but how do I tell the second agent I'm really happy she wants to see more but she has to wait?

Successful queriers and pitchers end up in this kind of dilemma all the time, often without understanding how they ended up there or why they're stressed out about what was presumably the outcome they were seeking when they approached multiple agents simultaneously: more than one agent interested in reading their work. An exclusive is always a good thing, they reason nervously, a sign that an agent was unusually eager to see a queried or pitched book, and thus decided to bypass her usual method of requesting manuscripts.

Not always, no. But it depends.

Sometimes, a request for an exclusive genuinely does indicate an agent's being so excited by a query or pitch (especially if that book has just won a major literary contest) that she's afraid that another agent will snap it up first. Far more frequently, a surprise request for an exclusive is the natural and should-have-been-expected outcome when a writer approaches an agent working at an agency that has an exclusives-only policy.

Does that forest of hands springing up out there mean some of you have been paying attention? "But Anne," attentive readers everywhere shout, "isn't that precisely the kind of behavior you have been exhorting us not to practice?"

Yes, shouters: help yourself to a gold star out of petty cash. A savvy querier does indeed double-check every agency's submission policies every time.

But let's say that you didn't. Again, that wouldn't exactly place you in the minority -- the overwhelming majority of queriers don't read each individual agency's submission guidelines before sending out those letters. We shall discuss in Part II what to do in that instance, never fear.

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October 25, 2014

Part II: tiptoeing in Virginia's size 8s

If you find yourself teetering uncomfortably in Virginia's steps, don't worry. You're certainly not the only aspiring writer that's ever slipped into those moccasins. Heck, you're probably not the only one to try to trudge a mile in them today.

Especially likely to find themselves limping through this dilemma: pitchers and queriers who do what virtually every aspiring writer asked to submit materials does -- and what Virginia probably did here: sending out pages within hours of receiving the request.

It's a completely understandable faux pas, especially if the request arises from a query. Overjoyed at what they assume (in this case, wrongly) will be the only interest their queries will generate, many multiply-querying writers don't pause to consider that multiple requests for manuscripts are always a possible outcome while sending out simultaneous queries.

Thus, it follows as night the day, so is a situation where one of those agents requests an exclusive. And it follows as day the night that an exclusive request is also a possibility when pitching at a conference.

This is why, in case any of you inveterate conference-goers have been curious, agents and editors invariably sigh when an aspiring writer raises his hand to ask some form of this particular question -- and it's not for the reason that other aspiring writers will sigh at it. (The latter usually sigh because wish they had this problem, and again, who could blame them?) The pros will sigh because they're thinking, Okay, did this writer just not do his homework on the agents he approached? Or is he asking me to tell him that he can blithely break the commitment he's made to Agent #1? Does this writer seriously believe all agents are in league together, that I would be able to grant permission to insult one of my competitors?

That's why everyone else will sigh. I, however, sigh because my thought process runs like this: okay, I have to assume that the questioner is someone who hasn't read my blog. As much as it pains me to consider, not every writer currently occupying the earth's crust has access to my archives, which contain a dramatically-reenacted scenario directly related to this issue in my Industry Etiquette series. So I shall eschew the temptation just to send the questioner to any or all of those posts, try to understand how and why this situation is unique, and answer the question for the 1,477th time. Because a good writer is in anguish, gosh darn it!"

Yes, I can think with that much specificity in mid-sigh, thank you very much. It's just one of my many, many dubious talents.

All that being said -- or, at any rate, thought exceptionally loudly -- it is undoubtedly true that more writers than ever before seem to be finding themselves enmeshed in Virginia's dilemma. Or simply unsure about whether it's okay to submit to more than one agent at once. Quite a bit of the common wisdom out there, after all, dictates that writers should wait to hear back on one submission before sending out the next.

The short answer to that: poppycock! The long answer -- and I sincerely hope that by now you saw this coming -- is it depends.

On what? On the individual agency's policies, of course, as well as how the agent in question phrased the request for pages. And, lest we forget, upon the writer's planned submission schedule.

Let's face it, more than one agent's reading your pages simultaneously constitutes a fairly significant advantage. In an environment where submission volumes are so high that even a requested full manuscript may well sit on a corner of an agent's desk for a year or more -- and that's after Millicent has already decided she liked it enough to pass it along to her boss-- just presuming that any agent would prefer to be the only one considering a manuscript could add years to the submission process. If an agency has a no-reply-if-the-reply-will-be-no policy, stated or unstated, the hapless submitter can have no idea whether silence means (a) no, (b) the manuscript got lost in transit, (c) the manuscript got lost at the agency, d) those pesky giants made a meal of it -- or e), most common of all: the agent just hasn't had time to read it yet.

Well might you turn pale. As agencies have been cutting their staffs over the last few years (and aspiring writers who wouldn't have had time to query or submit before the economic downturn have been digging old manuscripts out of bottom desk drawers), turn-around times lengthened demonstrably. Not entirely coincidentally, the practice of not informing a submitter if the answer is no has increased dramatically. So has hanging on to a manuscript someone at the agency likes in the hope that market conditions will improve for that type of book.

An unfortunate side effect: more and more submitters who just don't know whether they can legitimately grant exclusives to another agent or not. How could they, when they have heard that writers should never bug agents while their manuscripts are under consideration?

All of which is to say: let's not be smug when a fellow writer finds himself stuck in this particular tar pit. It actually isn't fair to leap to the conclusion that if aspiring writers read agents' websites and agency guide listings more thoroughly, they would never end up in this situation. Sometimes, an exclusive request does come out of a genuinely blue sky, whacking a conscientious multiple querier or submitter right in the noggin.

How is that possible? Amazingly often, the writer simply does not know that exclusivity is even a remote possibility until an agent asks for it. Unless an agency has an exclusives-only policy (do I need to remind you again to check?), the prospect generally will not be mentioned in its submission guidelines.

Then, too, the request for an exclusive is seldom formulated in a manner that informs a writer not already aware of the fact that she can say no. Or that she can defer saying yes, granting the exclusive at a later date. Or put a time limit on the exclusive, if she agrees to it at all.

All perfectly legitimate responses to a request for an exclusive, incidentally. But whether any of them is situationally-appropriate depends on the actual content of the request; they vary more than one might think.

I can, however, rule out a couple of possibilities up front. First, there is no such thing as an implied request for an exclusive; such requests are always directly stated. So unless an agent or editor specifically asked for an exclusive peek at all or part of a manuscript or the agency has a clearly-posted exclusives-only policy on its website, a writer does not need to worry at all about offending Agent A by submitting simultaneously submitting the same manuscript to Agent B.

Yes, really. Just mention in your cover letters to each that another agent is looking at it -- no need to say which one -- and you should be fine.

Would you fling the nearest portable object in my general direction, though, if I swiftly added that the advisability of even this morally blameless route sometimes depends upon factors beyond the writer's knowledge and control? Back in my querying days, I blithely sent off requested materials to a seventh agent, while six were already considering it. In that, I was being completely ethical: all seven's agencies websites, communications with me, and listings in the standard agency guides failed to mention any exclusives-only policies. Nor did #7's request for the manuscript specify that he wanted an exclusive. That being the case, I simply told him in my cover letter that he was not the only agent reading the book.

You can see this coming, can't you?

I must admit, I didn't -- his irate announcement that his agency never considered multiple submissions left me pretty gobsmacked. But once he had expressed that preference, I was compelled to abide by his rules, even though they were late-breaking news: I had to choose whether to e-mail him back to say I accepted his terms, and would be telling Nos. 1-6 that my manuscript was no longer available, or to apologize for not being aware of what I could not possibly have known and withdraw my submission to him. I chose the latter, and lived to submit another day.

I sense some of you seething, do I not? "But Anne!" the hot-blooded among you cry, and I'm grateful for your ire on my behalf. "That wasn't fair! Why didn't you insist that he abide by what you thought were the original terms of the submission?"

Because, passionate ones, as Thomas Hobbes once so rightly observed, rights are the ability to enforce them. Arguing with an agent about his own submission policies is always a losing proposition for a writer.

So before you say yes to an exclusive, make sure you understand its terms, as well as what granting it would mean for you. Read that request very, very carefully, as well as the agency's website. (Yes, again; they might have changed their policies since you sent your query.) Will the exclusive be open-ended, or is the agent asking for you to hold off on submitting elsewhere for a particular period of time? If the request doesn't specify an end date -- and most exclusive requests don't -- would you feel comfortable setting the request aside for a few months while you responded to any other agents that had already expressed interest? Or if it took three months to get an answer from an agent that already had the manuscript?

Stop gasping like a beached whale. A three-month turn-around on a manuscript submission would be a positively blistering rate, by some standards. If that's upsetting to hear, I'd advise averting your eyes from that last sentence and scrolling down to Part III.

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A R C H I V E / H I G H L I G H T S

Part III: alas, poor Virginia. I knew her, Horatio.
originally posted: October 25, 2014

While we're brainstorming questions, here's another: are you absolutely positive that the agent is asking for an exclusive? Oh, you may laugh, but sometimes, in the heat of excitement at hearing a yes, a successful querier -- or, even more commonly, a successful pitcher -- will slightly misinterpret what he's being asked to do.

Yes, really. Many a super-excited conference attendee has floated away from a pitch meeting falsely believing that he and the agent have hit it off so darned well in that ten-minute conference that obviously, the agent must be expecting an exclusive. Heck, good ol' (fill in polite pitch-listener's name here) would be positively hurt if her new buddy allowed another agent so much as a peek at it, right?

Um, wrong. Chant it with me now, close readers: unless an agent specifically asks for an exclusive or her agency has an established exclusives-only policy, you are free to submit as widely as you wish. The same holds true if you have indeed received a request for an exclusive, but have not yet granted it. While the manuscript remains in your hands, you retain complete control.

Feel better, submitters? I thought so. Remember, a request for an exclusive is in fact a request, not a command. Even if a writer receives one or more requests for an exclusive, she's not under any obligation to grant any or all of them-- nor does she need to agree to any right away.

That's vital to know going in, because as soon as the writer has agreed to an exclusive, she does in fact have to honor it. So it's in the writer's best interest to give the matter some advance thought.

I just felt half of you tense up at the very notion of delaying so much as forty consecutive seconds before bellowing, "Yes! Yes! Whatever you want, agent of my dreams," but think about it. If Virginia had pondered Agent A's request for a week or two, wouldn't she have found herself in a much, much happier dilemma when Agent B's epistle arrived? Then, she would merely have had to decide to which she wanted to submit first, the one that wanted the exclusive or the one that didn't.

What would have been the right answer here, you ask with bated breath? Easy: it depends.

Upon what? Feel free to pull out your songbooks and sing along: if Agent A's agency's had a posted exclusives-only submission policy, he had a right to expect Virginia to be aware of it before she queried, and thus to believe that by querying him, she was agreeing to that condition. If an agency will only accept solo submissions, that's that: it's not as though Virginia could negotiate an exception in her case.

It would also depend upon whether the agent put a time limit on the request. It's rare that an agent or editor includes a start date in an exclusive request (they have other manuscripts waiting on their desks, after all), but they do occasionally specify how long they expect the exclusive to be.

Given Virginia's surprise, though, my guess is that neither of these conditions applied. That means, ethically, the choice of when the exclusive would commence would be up to her.

The only thing she could not legitimately do was submit to both A and B after A said he would read it only as an exclusive. That does not necessarily mean, however, that if Virginia wanted to submit to A first, she could not suggest a time limit on the exclusive, in order to enable her to take advantage of B's interest if A decided to pass.

And a thousand jaws hit the floor. Yes, yes, I know: the very idea of the writer's saying, "Yes, Agent A, although you did not specify a time limit, I would love to grant you a three-month exclusive -- here's the manuscript!" would seem to run counter to the idea that the requester gets to set the terms of the exclusive. But in Virginia's case, I happen to know (my spies are everywhere) that Agent A is of the ilk that does not habitually specify an end date for an exclusive. So proposing one would not constitute arguing with him; it would merely be telling him how long she believes she is agreeing to refrain from sending the manuscript elsewhere.

He could always make a counterproposal, after all. Or ask for more time at the end of those three months. It's a reasonable length of time, though, so he probably won't say no -- as he would, in all likelihood, if she set the time at something that would require him to rearrange his schedule to accommodate, like three weeks.

Why so glum? Was it something I said? "Three months?" the impatient groan. "I thought you were kidding about that earlier. To me, three weeks sounds like a long time to hear back! If the agent is interested enough to request an exclusive, why shouldn't I expect a rapid reply?"

Ah, that's a common misconception. 99.999% of the time, what an aspiring writer asked for an exclusive thinks the agent is saying is not, "Okay, your book sounds interesting and marketable, but I don't want to have to rush to beat competing agents in reading the manuscript. Please remove the necessity of my having to hurry by agreeing not to show it to anyone else until I've gotten back to you."

Which is, incidentally, what a request for exclusivity means, at base. Rather deflating to think of it that way, isn't it? It is, however, realistic.

By contrast, what 99.999% of aspiring writers in this situation hear is "Oh, my God -- this is the most exciting book premise/query/pitch I've ever heard. I'm almost positive that I want to represent it, even though I have not yet read a single word of the manuscript or book proposal, and thus have absolutely no idea whether it is written well. Because my marrow is thrilled to an extent unprecedented in my professional experience, I shall toss all of my usual submission expectations and procedures out the nearest window. If you grant my request for an exclusive, exceptional writer, I'm going to clear my schedule so I may delve into this submission the nanosecond it arrives in my office. May I have it today -- or, at the very latest, tomorrow -- so I can stop holding my breath until it arrives?"

And then the giddy submitter is astonished when weeks or months pass before the agent makes a decision, precisely as if there had been no exclusive involved. The only difference between that and a regular old submission, from the writer's point of view, is that he was honor-bound not to approach other agents until he heard back.

Pardon my asking, but what did the writer gain by granting that exclusive? Or by not politely attempting to place a time limit upon it from the get-go?

I'm sympathetic to the impulse not to look that gift horse firmly in the mouth, but frankly, many, if not most, aspiring writers confuse initial interest with a commitment. Too often, aspiring writers consider an agent's request for materials, whether as an exclusive or not, as a signal that the long quest to find a home for that manuscript has come to an end. Acceptance is assured, right?

Then time passes, and the opposite reaction sets in. Remember how good writers can be at spinning those scenarios? That's even more tempting in the face of a request for an exclusive. Frequently, supposition starts to seem like fact.

"Why would an agent ask to see a manuscript exclusively," they reason, "unless she already thought she might want to sign the author? There must be something else going on. Like hungry giants having overrun the agency."

A fair enough question, except for the giants part, but I'm not sure you're going to like the answer. Typically, an agent won't ask for an exclusive (or to see the manuscript, for that matter) unless she thinks representing it as a possibility; it is a genuine compliment. However, as agents who ask for exclusives seldom make the request of only one writer at a time, it's not very prudent for a writer to presume that his will be the only exclusive on the agent's desk.

If that last bit made your stomach drop to somewhere around your knees, please don't feel blue, or even slightly mauve. The vast majority of writers who have ever been asked for an exclusive peek at their work were under laboring under the same presumption. All too often, aspiring writers agree to an exclusive without understanding what it will entail -- and usually are either too excited or too shy to ask follow-up questions before they pack off those requested materials.

For the benefit of those overjoyed and/or excited souls, I'm going to invest some blog space into going over what granting that solo peek will and will not require. If you're planning upon querying an agency that will only consider submissions exclusively, you might want to bookmark this page, for your rereading pleasure.

Within the context of submission, an exclusive calls for a writer to allow an agent time to consider representing a particular manuscript, a period during which no other agent will be reviewing it. In practice, both the agent and the writer agree to abide by certain rules:

(a) only that agent will have an opportunity to read the requested materials;

(b) no other agent is already looking at it;

(c) the writer will not submit it anywhere else;

(d) in return for these significant advantages (which, after all, pull the manuscript out of consideration with other agents), the agent will make a legitimate effort to read and decide whether or not to offer representation, but

(e) if no time restriction is specified in advance, or if the agency always requests exclusives, the manuscript may simply be considered on precisely the same timeframe as every other requested by the agency.

That's not so complicated, is it? Okay, so maybe all of that if/then logic is. Just let it sink in while we move swiftly on to Part IV.

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Part IV: but my creative brain sees more possibilities!
originally posted: October 25, 2014

Now that we know what Virginia agreed to do in granting an exclusive to Agent A, as well as what her options would have been had she received Agent B's request before she had sent off the first submission, let's take a gander what she should do about the situation she described in her question. (You knew I would get to it eventually, right?)

The answer is, as you have probably guessed, it depends. If she wants to play by the rules -- and she should, always -- her choices are three.

If she specified a time limit on the exclusive when she granted it to Agent A, the answer is very simple: if less than that amount of time has passed, don't send the manuscript to anyone else until it has. On the day after the exclusive has elapsed, she is free to submit to other agents.

What is she to tell Agent B in the interim? Nothing, if the agreed-upon length of the exclusive is reasonable -- say, between three and six months.

Breathing into a paper bag will stop that hyperventilation in no time. While you recover, consider: agencies often face monumental backlogs. It's also not uncommon for agents and editors to read promising manuscripts at home, in their spare time, because they are so swamped.

And no, Virginia, waiting that long before submitting requested materials to B will not seem strange. Agents are perfectly used to writers taking some time to revise. B probably wouldn't blink twice if she didn't get back to him for a few months.

Remember, it's not as though an agent who requests materials sits there, twiddling his thumbs, until he receives it. He's got a lot of manuscripts already sitting on his desk -- and piled on the floor, threatening to tumble of his file cabinet, stacked next to his couch, and causing his backpack to overflow on the A train. Not to mention the legions of paper hanging out in Millicent's cubicle, awaiting a first screening.

Besides, what would Virginia gain by telling him she'd already promised an exclusive to another agent, other than implicitly informing him that she had already decided that if Agent A offered representation, she would take it? How exactly would that win her Brownie points with B? Or, indeed, help her at all?

And no, Virginia, however tempting it is, informing A that B is twiddling his thumbs, impatiently waiting for A to polish off those pages, will not necessarily speed A's reading rate. Why should it, when A's got an exclusive?

In practice, then, all waiting on fulfilling the second request means is that Virginia will have an attractive alternative if A decides to pass on the manuscript. That's bad because...?

Oh, wait: it isn't. Actually, it's an ideal situation for a just-rejected submitter to find herself occupying. Way to go, Virginia!

"But Anne!" I hear the more empathetic among you fretting. "I'm worried about what might happen to Virginia if Agent A doesn't get back to her within the specified time frame? It's not as though she can pick up the phone and tell him his time's up, is it? (Please say yes. Please say yes. Please say yes.)"

I'm going to say no to that last one -- it's always considered rude to call an agent while he's considering your manuscript -- but relax. Our Virginia still has several pretty good options: one completely above-board, one right on the board, and the last slightly under it.

First, the high road: a week or two after the agreed-upon exclusive expires, Virginia could send Agent A a courteous e-mail (not a call), reminding him that the exclusive has elapsed. Would A like more time to consider the manuscript solo, or should Virginia send the manuscript out to the other agents who have requested it?

Naturally, if A selects the latter, she would be delighted to have him continue to consider the manuscript also. That's fortunate, because I can already tell you the answer will be the former, if A has not yet had a chance to read it.

It's also quite possible, though, that the response to this charming little missive will be silence. Quite a bit of it. As in weeks or months of it.

Oh, stop clutching your chests -- Virginia did not just harm her chances by following up. That delay might mean that Agent A is no longer interested, but it might also mean that he intended to answer and forgot. Or that he's planning to read her manuscript really, really soon. Or that he's taking her at her word about no longer enjoying an exclusive, but honestly believes he can make a decision on the manuscript before another agent has a chance to make an offer. As each of these is actually pretty plausible, Virginia should most emphatically not take A's silence as an invitation to load him with recriminations about not getting back to her.

Which, unfortunately, is what submitters in this situation usually do. It's entirely wasted effort: if the answer was no, jumping up and down to try to regain the agent's attention won't change that; if the agent hasn't had a chance to read it yet, reproaches will seldom move a manuscript up in a reading queue. And that phone call that seemed like such a good idea at the time will generally result in rejection on the spot.

So what is Virginia to do? Well, ethically, she is no longer bound by that exclusive. She should presume that A's answer was no, elevate her noble chin -- and send out that submission to Agent B without contacting A again.

That's the high road. The writer doesn't achieve much by taking it, usually, other than possibly an extension of the exclusive, but you must admit, it's classy. The level road is cosmetically similar, but allows the writer more freedom.

It runs a little something like this: a week or two after the exclusive has elapsed, Virginia could write an e-mail to Agent A, informing him courteously and without complaint (again, harder than it sounds) that since the agreed-upon period of exclusivity has passed, she's going to start sending out requested materials to other agents. If A decides he would like to represent the book, she would love to hear from him. Then she should follow through on her promise immediately, informing Agent B in her cover letter that another agent is also considering the work.

I heard you gasp, but you read that right: Virginia should submit those requested materials to Agent B without waiting to hear back from Agent A. That way, she gets what she wants -- the ability to continue to circulate her work -- while not violating her agreement with Agent A and being honest with Agent B. All she is doing is being up front about abiding by the terms of the exclusive.

Might she receive an e-mail from A afterward, asking for more time? Possibly. If so, she can always agree not to accept an offer from another agent until after some specified date. That was what Agent A had in mind when he asked for the exclusive in the first place, right, the chance to be first in line to represent the book? He could always ask for more time.

The slightly subterranean third option would be not to send an e-mail at all, but merely wait until the exclusive has lapsed, then send out the manuscript to Agent B. Virginia should, of course, inform B that there's another agent reading it. I don't favor this option, personally: despite the fact that she would be perfectly within her rights to pursue it, if Agent A does eventually decide to make an offer, Virginia will be left in a rather awkward position.

Enviable, of course, but still a bit uncomfortable. I'd stick to one of the higher roads -- unless, of course, after months of waiting, Virginia isn't certain that she can resist pointing out to Agent A that time is in fact linear, and quite a lot of it has been passing. It's not in her interest to pick a fight, after all.

The shortness of the space between here and the bottom of this post is making some of you nervous, isn't it? "But Anne," you quaver, shifting in your desk chairs, "I'm going to be up all night, wondering what happened next in Virginia's story. I can see another possible road here: what happens if the exclusive Virginia agreed to grant Agent A didn't have a time limit? How long must those of us who deal in linear time wait to submit to an Agent B? That seems like the most complicated option of all, so I'm really, really hoping that you're not planning to trot out that annoying it depends line again."

Well, her options would depend on quite a number of things, but you're quite right that discussing the perils and escape hatches of the unlimited exclusive is too complex to toss off in an aphorism. I shall deal with it in depth next time.

For now, suffice it to say that as exciting as a request for an exclusive may be, it is not a gift horse to clamber upon without some pretty thorough examination of its dentistry. Before you saddle it -- and yourself -- take the time to consider what the ride might be like. And, of course, keep up the good work!

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A B O U T   T H E   A U T H O R

Anne Mini multipliedAnne Mini grew up in the middle of a Zinfandel vineyard in the Napa Valley. After graduating magna cum laude from Harvard, writing for Let's Go, and composing back label copy for wine bottles, she spent several years teaching Plato and Confucius to frat boys at a large, football-oriented university. She has since gratefully given up academia in order to write and edit full-time. Her memoir, A Family Darkly: Love, Loss, and the Final Passions of Philip K. Dick, won the 2004 Zola Award. She has also won numerous writing fellowships, as well as being a finalist for an NEH Fellowship. She holds a master’s degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington. She currently lives in Seattle, writing and book doctoring for good writers.


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