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Nonfiction Authors Association
by:  Stephanie Chandler, Nonfiction Authors Association
web:  http://NonfictionAuthorsAssociation.com
twitter:  http://www.twitter.com/NonfictionAssoc
An educational community with 14k+ members, featuring weekly educational teleseminars, templates, checklists and other content, online forum, partner discounts, local chapters, year-round book awards program, annual Nonfiction Writers Conference and mor
February 6, 2017

100 Ways to Grow an Audience for Your Nonfiction Book


1. Be clear about your target (niche) audience and spend time, online or in person, where they are.

2. Join industry associations where your target audience spends time.

3. Contribute to industry blogs, newsletters and publications that reach your target audience.

4. Participate in online groups (Facebook, LinkedIn, etc.).

5. Start your own group on Facebook or LinkedIn.

6. Add an email sign up box to your website.

7. Add an email sign up box to your Facebook page.

8. Frequently invite people to subscribe and share a link to your email sign up form via all of your social media channels.

9. Develop a campaign to constantly grow your email list, such as hosting free webinars or teleseminars and requiring registration to participate.

10. Leverage your email list by being strategic with your content. Share helpful information, include a personal greeting from you, provide resources, and promote your offerings.

11. Host your own podcast.

12. Be a guest on other people’s podcasts. Locate relevant shows on iTunes, then search the hosts’ websites for pitch guidelines.

13. Pitch yourself as a guest on internet radio shows like those on http://blogtalkradio.com.

14. Be a guest on teleseminars and webinars hosted by your peers.

15. Give away an information product, such as a free report, worksheets, checklists or a whitepaper. (Don’t forget to require registration to capture email addresses.)

16. Include a page in your book that asks readers who like your book to review it on Amazon, Goodreads, etc.

17. Include a bonus offer in your book that brings readers to your website, such as a downloadable list of resources.

18. Sell downloadable products that meet the needs of your target audience.

19. Leverage direct mail campaigns—postcards are an affordable option.

20. Ask readers to tell a friend about your book.

21. Partner with peers who reach your audience.

22. Create a YouTube channel and share videos frequently.

23. Start using Periscope.

24. Update your blog at least two to three times per week. Statistically, the more you blog the more traffic your site will receive.

25. Always include an image with each blog post and tag it with relevant key words for that page.

26. Write compelling blog post titles that make people want to read more.

27. Ask blog readers a question that invites them to leave a comment.

28. Share blog post links across all of your social media networks.

29. Engage with blog comments—respond to each.

30. Once a blog post is over 30 days old, publish on LinkedIn Pulse.

31. Conduct give-aways and contests on your blog.

32. Invite guest contributors to your blog and then ask them to promote the link to their own audience.

33. Post compelling comments on peer and major news blogs.

34. Pitch yourself as a speaker at relevant events where your audience spends time.

35. Always provide a memorable handout to audiences where you speak that includes tips or information they will want to keep, plus your bio and contact information.

36. Leverage connections from your past schools and employers to seek out speaking and other promotional opportunities.

37. Generate book reviews on an ongoing basis by contacting Amazon reviewers and offering a review copy.

38. Leverage review services such as NetGalley and Goodreads. More info on book reviews here.

39. Send review copies of your book to bloggers in your industry.

40. Pursue traditional publicity with print, radio and television.

41. Ensure you have a consistent bio and website URL across your social media platforms.

42. Have custom social media headers designed at http://fiverr.com.

43. Participate on Twitter and tweet at least three times per day.

44. Pre-schedule your tweets and social media posts with a tool such as http://hootsuite.com.

45. Schedule retweets of your past blog archives on Twitter.

46. Host a Twitter chat.

47. Post engaging content to Facebook several times each week.

48. Invest in Facebook advertising to generate more page likes and reach your audience.

49. Make sure your LinkedIn profile has a compelling title and plenty of keyword-rich content.

50. Import your contacts to LinkedIn so that you can connect.

51. Get in the habit of adding new contacts in LinkedIn.

52. Ask readers and clients to write recommendations for you on LinkedIn.

53. If you’re targeting a younger audience or have a visual component to what you do, start utilizing Instagram.

54. Pin images from your blog to Pinterest.

55. Create keyword-rich boards on Pinterest.

56. Monitor and engage with your audience on social media daily.

57. Optimize your website with relevant keyword phrases to increase traffic.

58. Conduct surveys to learn from your audience and find ways to meet their needs and challenges.

59. Teach courses and workshops for your audience.

60. Participate in book awards programs to gain recognition.

61. Host a booth at an industry event or trade show.

62. Give away copies of your book to media pros, influential industry people, bloggers and anyone willing to review or promote.

63. Create branded photo memes or infographics that will get shared via social media.

64. Always offer to take a photo with readers and encourage them to share on social media.

65. Post photos of you with your readers on social media and tag them when possible.

66. Host a promotion challenging readers to share a photo with your book—offer a reward for best entries.

67. Hire an experienced virtual assistant to help with promotion. Sources: http://virtualassistants.com, http://ivaa.org.

68. Launch and promote services related to your book, such as coaching or consulting.

69. Host a related online course for several weeks.

70. If you create slide decks, share them on http://slideshare.com.

71. Review and refresh your website periodically to make sure it accurately reflects where you are in your career.

72. Sign up for media updates from HARO: http://helpareporter.com.

73. Join http://profnet.com for media leads (paid service).

74. Send press releases via PRNewswire and/or PRWeb.

75. Whenever you receive media coverage, post a link and/or image to the media page on your website.

76. Start a local group via http://meetup.com.

77. Attend conferences and events where your target audience will be.

78. Pursue writing a regular column for a key industry publication.

79. Conduct a virtual book tour.

80. Host a fundraiser for your favorite nonprofit.

81. Give away the first two chapters of your book to new mailing list subscribers.

82. Invest in Google ads.

83. Sign up to be an expert on http://clarity.fm.

84. Register to answer questions on http://quora.com.

85. Host a free ebook giveaway to revive an older title that is no longer selling well. Offer it as a PDF for people who register on your website.

86. Send copies of your book as give-aways or door prizes at events.

87. Ask friends and family to help promote. Make it easy by providing copy they can use for email and social media.

88. Leverage your Amazon Author Central account by updating the content on your book’s page and adding editorial reviews.

89. When making an appearance of any kind, dress professionally, remove your ego and leave people with a good impression.

90. Invest in promotional “swag” like bookmarks, coffee mugs, or unique items that relate to your book.

91. Make sure you have a great book sales page on your own website. It should include the jacket copy, reviews, a cover image and a link to purchase online.

92. Get big-name authors from your industry to endorse your next book (you’d be surprised by how easy this can be).

93. Hire a professional publicist.

94. Create buzz-worthy companion products such as apps, games, workbooks or card decks.

95. Contact reporters directly and pitch story ideas that you can contribute to.

96. Purchase a media list from http://gebbiepress.com.

97. Pitch yourself to give a TEDx talk (most TEDx chapters release a periodic call for speakers).

98. Create alerts at http://talkwalker.com so you can monitor when someone mentions your name, your book or your website link online—and then you can go thank them!

99. Commit to doing a minimum of three things each day to promote your books and author career.

100. Analyze your marketing campaigns and do more of what works!

Stephanie Chandler is the author of several books including The Nonfiction Book Marketing Plan: Online and Offline Promotion Strategies to Build Your Audience and Sell More Books. Stephanie is also founder and CEO of http://NonfictionAuthorsAssociation.com, a vibrant marketing community for trail-blazing writers, and http://NonfictionWritersConference.com, an annual event conducted entirely online. A frequent speaker at business events and on the radio, she has been featured in Entrepreneur, BusinessWeek, and Wired magazine.

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October 10, 2016

How to Sell Books When You Don't Have an Audience

Getting ready to publish and promote your book can be incredibly overwhelming the first time around (and the second, third and even 20th time around!).
After getting your book published, the greatest challenge all authors face is attracting buyers. This job is made even more difficult if you don’t yet have an audience (AKA “platform”). But that doesn’t mean you should just sit back. There are plenty of ways you can build momentum for book sales.

Contact Bloggers
Start building a list of bloggers who reach your target audience. For example, if you’ve authored a book on parenting, make a list of every blog that also covers parenting topics. Next, check to see if they publish book reviews. If so, submit yours for consideration. If not, look for their submission guidelines and contribute guest articles for the site. You could also contact the blog owner and offer to host a contest to give away a few copies of your book.

Reaching out to established bloggers is one of the best ways to get out in front of your audience quickly. Bloggers can have tremendous influence with their readers, so leverage their audience to find your own!

Hint: For Google searches, try these combinations (change “parenting” to your genre):
“parenting book review”
“parenting blog”
“parenting advice”
“call for guest posts parenting”

Internet Radio and Podcasts
I’ve always been a fan or internet radio shows and podcasts. There are all kinds of shows that reach a niche audience, and they all need guests! You can search through shows on iTunes and BlogTalkRadio.com. Locate the show website and look for pitching guidelines.

This can be a time consuming task, so if you’d like a shortcut, we offer lists of internet radio shows and podcasts here.

Generate Book Reviews
The main goal should be to get people talking about your book, and that means that you need to get copies of your book into as many hands as possible. It’s also important to generate reviews on Amazon because that not only has a positive impact on how Amazon displays your book, but it also influences potential buyers.

My favorite way to start generating book reviews is to contact existing Amazon book reviewers—the people who have reviewed similar books in your genre. Every Amazon reviewer has a public profile. Simply click on their name and you will be taken to it, where many list their email address and website.

Next, send an email that says you noticed that the reviewer enjoyed XYZ book, and would she like to receive a review copy of your book? Nine times out of ten, you’ll get a solid yes. As a bonus, many of these reviewers also host their own blogs and websites where they may also post your review.

Note that you need to be prepared to send either a hard copy or digital copy of your book. Be willing and able to send both.

For more ideas, download our free report: 50 Ways to Generate Book Reviews.

Industry Publications
If you’ve ever walked into a Barnes and Noble, you’ve probably noticed that there is usually an entire wall dedicated to magazines. Many of them are smaller, niche publications—and they want your articles. Check their websites for submission guidelines or simply send an email to the editor with the body of an article pasted into the email, along with a simple note like this:

Dear Ed Editor,

Below please find an article I wrote about ten ways to grow plants in the winter. Would you be interested in publishing this in Gardeners Monthly Magazine?

Thanks for your consideration,
Annie Author

Be sure to include your bio at the end of the article—a short paragraph about you and your book, along with a link to your website.

Trade Associations
Whatever the theme is for your book, whether it’s about overcoming an illness or how to build tree houses, there is likely a trade association that is interested in your expertise. You can search google for associations, and also check out this directory of associations.

Check association websites for article submission guidelines. Most associations publish a newsletter or magazine, either in print or digital format. Many also host blogs. Become a regular contributor and you can reach lots of potential readers. And some associations list recommended books so be sure to submit yours for consideration.

Professional Speaking
While you research trade associations, keep in mind that you can also become a speaker at association meetings and annual conferences, or even offer to conduct a webinar or teleseminar remotely. In addition to associations, you can speak at schools, service organizations, chambers of commerce and Meetup groups. Speakers tend to sell a lot of books at the back of the room, so this can be a worthwhile endeavor if you have the time and you enjoy speaking.

While you’re making all of these efforts to build exposure for your book, be sure that you’re also building your audience at the same time. Have a mailing list sign-up box on your website, update your blog regularly, and get engaged with at least one or two social media platforms. When you take these steps, it will get easier to promote your books with time.

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December 18, 2015

The Top 7 Habits of Highly Successful Authors


Book marketing is tough work, and many authors don’t realize this until after their books have been launched into the world. I speak with authors every day who are frustrated, overwhelmed and unsure about what to do next. But I also speak with authors who have figured out how to make their book marketing efforts pay off in big ways.

Following are some top strategies that create success for authors. Put all seven to work for you and you’ll have no choice but to succeed.

1. Know Your Audience – Trying to sell a book to anyone who can fog a mirror is the quickest way to author burn-out. The reality is that it is easier to connect with a niche audience. Let’s look at this from a potential reader’s perspective. If you are a working mom who struggles to find enough energy each day, which book would you be more likely to read?

10 Steps to Better Nutrition: Strategies for Healthier Eating
OR
The Busy Woman’s Guide to Instant Energy: Easy Nutrition Strategies to Improve Health, Mood and Stamina.

Lesson learned: Choose a clear target audience. Even if your book is already out and it doesn’t speak to a narrowly defined audience, you can begin focusing your marketing efforts on reaching your niche. Once you know who they are, then focus your efforts on solving their pain points. This is sure to earn you loyal fans.

2. Build a Solid Online Presence – The reality today is that we spend the majority of our time online, and that’s where potential readers are looking for books, content, and solutions. Your online presence should include a professionally-designed website with a blog and a social media strategy. As an author, you are an instant AUTHORity in your field. You can demonstrate this, and attract more opportunities, by investing in your website, updating your blog at least twice each week, and building a solid social media presence.

3. Embrace Speaking – As an author speaking engagement opportunities will likely come to you whether you want them or not. And if you can develop your skills as a great presenter, you will sell more books, reach more people, and build your business. If you need some support in this journey, try Toastmasters and The National Speakers Association.

4. Leverage Publicity – Successful authors pursue media opportunities by reaching out to local and national news shows, radio programs, newspapers and magazines. And today, even more media opportunities can be found online through bloggers, internet radio shows, podcasts, and webinars. Learn to pitch the media, and what it takes to be a great source for interviews. Professional media training can be a valuable investment.

5. Develop Companion Revenue Streams – Books have a notoriously low profit margin. Depending on how your book was published, you may earn from $1 to $10 per book. No matter which end of the profit scale you’re on, you will have to sell truckloads of books to make a living. Successful authors know that the book is a launch pad to bigger revenue opportunities. Use your book to generate income from consulting, speaking, classes, workshops, related services, and downloadable information products. Even creating just one of these revenue streams can make that book worthwhile.

6. Hire Some Help – I don’t know of any successful author who does it all himself. If you want to grow your author career and your business, you will need the help of other professionals which can include a website designer, graphic designer, bookkeeper, personal/virtual assistant, publicist, and marketing firm. Even if your budget is tight, investing in your future success will help speed up the process dramatically.

7. Prepare for the Marathon – While it’s great to start with some momentum around your book launch, remember that it’s a marathon, not a race. For long-term results, you need a long-term strategy and that involves doing something every day to market your books. Small efforts, implemented bit by bit, add up to big results over time. So commit to the process and know that you are always on tour, and always looking for new marketing opportunities. And don’t forget to have some fun along the way!

Stephanie Chandler is the author of several books including The Nonfiction Book Marketing Plan: Online and Offline Promotion Strategies to Build Your Audience and Sell More Books. Stephanie is also founder and CEO of http://NonfictionAuthorsAssociation.com, a vibrant marketing community for trail-blazing writers, and http://NonfictionWritersConference.com, an annual event conducted entirely online. A frequent speaker at business events and on the radio, she has been featured in Entrepreneur, BusinessWeek, and Wired magazine.

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November 12, 2015

50+ Ways to Generate Book Reviews

Book reviews are essential because they help potential readers make a purchase decision. Sending out review copies for potential review is something every author should include in their marketing plans. The more people who know about your book, the better the chance of building word of mouth buzz. Plan to send out 50 to 500 review copies of your book in both print and digital formats.

Below is a comprehensive list of book review sources, including both free and paid options.
A note on paid options: We do NOT advocate paid services that promise to churn out X number of manufactured reviews based on how much money you spend with them. However, we have included a listing of reputable services that offer quality reviews.

Free Book Review Options:

Amazon Reviewers – Reviews on Amazon are hugely important to the success of a book. Potential buyers look to reviews to help make a decision to buy, and Amazon’s algorithms factor in the number of reviews a book has generated. The more reviews a book receives, the better the likelihood of that book showing up higher in Amazon search results.

Each Amazon book reviewer has a public profile, and many include their email addresses and website information (many top reviewers are also bloggers—for even greater exposure). These reviewers WANT to be contacted and offered free review copies! Look for reviewers of competing titles, send an email and ask if he/she would like to receive a review copy of your book.

Book Review Bloggers – Bloggers have tremendous influence with readers when it comes to reviewing and recommending books. See the following directories to find bloggers who review books in your genre. Also try searching Google for + “book review.”

Book Blogger Directory
The Book Blogger List
The Indie View
Blog Nation
The Indie Bookshelf

Industry Bloggers – Seek out bloggers who cover topics of interest to your target audience or industry. See if they conduct book reviews, publish book excerpts or interview authors. Google searches should help you compile a list of bloggers to contact.

Major Media Bloggers – All of the major magazines and newspapers now host blogs (from The New York Times to Cat Fancy Magazine), and many of those blog posts are written by unpaid contributors. Seek out freelance contributors who cover topics related to your target audience and offer up a review copy.

Email Subscribers – Periodically send a note to your mailing list subscribers gently reminding them that book reviews help sell books and that you’d greatly appreciate it if they would post a review for your book.

Midwest Book Review – A wonderful organization that supports indie authors, Midwest Book Review has been around for years and reviews printed books for free.

Smaller Publications – Don’t overlook trade association newsletters and magazines, plus smaller magazines and even hometown newspapers.

Your Website – Create a Review Copy Request form on your website. Ask visitors to provide you with details, including website link and size of audience, in order to qualify to receive a complimentary review copy.

Contest on Your Site – Consider using Rafflecopter, a simple program that you can plugin to your site to host a book give-away contest—it’s free! Gently ask (and remind) contest winners to post reviews after reading.

Online Groups – Announce that you are interested in sending out review copies to groups that reach your target audience. You can find all kinds of groups via:
• Facebook
• LinkedIn
• Yahoo
• Goodreads
• BookRix

Experience Project – This site features groups built around some very personal topics—from surviving abuse to living with addiction. Find topics related to your book and invite members to receive a complimentary review copy via Experience Project.

Book Clubs – Offering your book to book clubs for free can be a great way to generate reviews and buzz for your books. Search for book clubs by genre online and via Meetup.com. See also: From Left to Write, Book Club Reading List.

Goodreads Giveaways – More than 40,000 people enter to win books from Goodreads Give-aways each day. Authors can offer up books for free to this program and specify the number of days the promotion will run (they recommend 30 days). An average of 825 people enter to win these promotions, and Goodreads selects the winners at the end and sends authors a CSV file with addresses. When mailing copies of books to winners, be sure to insert a note requesting that the recipient write a review if they enjoy the book.

Other Giveaway Sites:
LibraryThing
Shelfari
BookLikes

***Note that if your book is enrolled in Amazon’s KDP Select program, you will not be able to participate in the sites listed here that conduct free ebook give-aways (a major downside of the Kindle exclusive distribution clause).

Noise Trade – This site allows you to list your ebook as a free give-away for any length of time you choose. In exchange, readers provide their email addresses, which you can download for follow-up. They can also provide a “tip” for authors, resulting in small fees potentially earned for books listed on Noise Trade.

Continue reading at NonfictionAuthorsAssociation.com

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October 8, 2015

Host an Ebook Promotion to Land on the NYT Bestsellers Lists!

Getting featured on the New York Times Bestsellers List is an ultimate goal for many authors, but not an easy one to accomplish. The list is compiled each week based on sales in brick and mortar bookstores, and for self-published authors that don’t have bookstore distribution, it’s impossible to reach the list. And the truth is that the vast majority of traditionally published authors won’t even reach the list either since thousands of books must be sold in a single week to achieve this status.

However, the NY Times also publishes and EBook Bestsellers List, which frequently features independent and self-published authors. While nobody knows for sure how many ebooks must be sold to end up on the list, some estimate that 500 ebooks sold in a week is a good starting point.

Of course 500 is a large sales number, but it can be far more achievable when an author conducts a focused preorder campaign.

Benefits of an Ebook Preorder Promotion

* The biggest and most exciting benefit is that all of the pre-sales accumulated will count toward your book’s TOTAL sales on launch day. This means that if you’ve done a stellar job with pre-promotion, you have a great chance of reaching the Ebook Bestsellers list.

*Sales accumulated prior to launch day will also count on the individual retailers’ bestseller lists, so you could potentially get listed on Amazon, Apple iBooks, Kobo and Barnes and Noble as a bestseller that week—and that exposure can generate even more sales.

*The act of promoting your book in advance of release gets readers excited. Building anticipation is sure to get people talking about your book, and ideally many will begin leaving reviews right away (reviews also influence future sales).

*You can begin your publicity strategy well in advance, allowing you to conduct media interviews and build momentum prior to launch day.

*All of these effort can also positively impact sales of your print book (if applicable), which should be released concurrently with the ebook version on launch day to maximize sales.

How to Host an Ebook Preorder Campaign

*Set up a preorder of your Kindle ebook with Amazon up to 90 days in advance. You will need to provide a digital copy of the manuscript, even if it’s not yet edited, to go through Amazon’s approval process, but the manuscript will not be distributed or shown to buyers. Within a couple of days, your preorder will be approved and you can begin promotion efforts. The Kindle preorder process is detailed here.

*Set up your ebook with the Smashwords preorder program, which will make your ebook available through its retail channels include Apple iBooks, Barnes and Noble Nook and Kobo.

Note that you should also have a professional book cover designed and ready to go with your campaign, and should be fairly certain of your launch date so as not to sabotage your efforts.

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A R C H I V E / H I G H L I G H T S

How to Get Interviews on Internet Radio Shows and Podcasts
originally posted: October 8, 2015

Though more well-known and listened to than in past years, internet radio shows are still an under-utilized promotion source for non-fiction writers. These often niche shows, though they boast a smaller listenership than traditional talk radio, can provide substantial opportunities to sell your book.

Here are some pluses about internet radio shows to consider:

*Internet shows usually have a narrow or niche topic or theme, reaching the right target audience for your book

*Guests are featured from 15 minutes to a full hour, which is far greater than the six to eight minutes you get on traditional talk radio

*Internet show listeners are often sitting at a desk, ready to make a purchase. Traditional radio listeners are usually in their cars and won’t remember to make a purchase later.

*Internet shows promote your appearance online to their networks, and then archive interviews online and on iTunes for long-lasting exposure

While I was in the midst of launching my book Own Your Niche: Hype-Free Internet Marketing Tactics to Establish Authority in Your Field and Promote Your Service-Based Business, my assistant sent out radio pitches for less than two weeks, and the invitations to be a guest on various shows came in steadily. On one day alone, I gave three interviews and watched my Amazon rank improve throughout the day.

One of the hosts booked me at the last minute and then thanked me for sending him a pitch. He said that he needs guests weekly and he’s surprised that more authors don’t reach out to him.

Did you get that? These shows NEED guests and want you to pitch to them!

You can start by researching programs on WSRadio, BlogTalkRadio, and alltalkradio.net. Also search for popular podcasts on iTunes. Podcast hosts need guests too!

Good luck!

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Harcover or Soft? Guest Post by Book Futurist Dan Poynter
originally posted: October 8, 2015

Traditionally and historically, books were manufactured in hardcover first. If they were successful, a softcover version would follow. And then sometimes a mass-market paperback a couple of years later.

The traditional industry wisdom said that the three editions appealed to different segments of society.

The early adopters purchased the hardcover.

Most bought the softcover because it took a year just to hear about the book.

The budget conscious waited for the cheaper mass-market paperback.

Beginning in 1980, the industry went through a paperback revolution. Now many books start out in softcover.

Visit a bookstore, check the shelf where your book is going to be, and respect the category.

If other books on your shelf are hardcover, then your book must be hardcover—because that is what buyers expect.

For more visit http://ParaPublishing.com.

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R E A D E R   C O M M E N T S

“As a new author, I can’t say enough good things about the wealth of information I’ve received from NFAA. The worksheets and information on specific topics is simply excellent! Thank you so much for the untold hours of research you’ve spared me as well as helping me know what I didn’t know I needed to know!”
– Marcia Grace “Calm, Creative, Joyful: Lessons in Transforming Your Life,” www.marciagrace.com

“I joined the Nonfiction Authors Assoc. about six months ago and I can’t say enough about how helpful all the info is that I receive weekly on everything I need to know as an author. I have just finished a second book and the info on finding agents, on self-publishing, and other valuable tips is extremely helpful.”
– Sandra CH Smith, Author of A Cook’s Tour of Epicuria — One Woman’s Adventures

A B O U T   T H E   A U T H O R

Founded by Stephanie Chandler, author of several books including The Nonfiction Book Marketing Plan, The Nonfiction Authors Association (NFAA)NFAA is over 14,000 members strong and growing each day. We feature a vibrant community for authors to connect, exchange ideas, and learn about book publishing and promotion. Our primary focus is to provide our members with educational resources and community support for nonfiction books including business, self-development, health and fitness, memoir, history, how-to, creative nonfiction and reference books. We also host an annual Nonfiction Writers Conference and a year-round Nonfiction Book Awards program. Join us and find out what all the buzz is about!


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